Lead on Purpose

Promoting Leadership Principles in Product Management


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How a cow describes your business model

Today I wanted to have a little bit of fun. Long-time readers probably know that I grew up on a cattle ranch, and despite my 20+ year career in products and leadership, I still love cows, horses and the rural life.

When I found this comparison of cows and businesses, I couldn’t pass up the chance to share it. So, here’s my attempt to use a bit of ‘cow-sense’ to describe eight models that will hopefully shed some light on ways to run your business.

cows-business models-2

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How to create a culture of innovation

Disruptive and incremental innovations: How to ascend the ladders and avoid the snakes

Guest post by Gaia Grant and Andrew Grant

Current realities are harsh. Whereas once it was enough to bring out slow incremental improvements, to give time to trial new products, services and ideas and test the market, innovations now need to be rapid and radical. And the competition is fierce.

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How leadership links to independence and prosperity

Today in the United States we’re celebrating Independence Day. This is a special time because it represents the efforts of great leaders, in the late 1700s, who risked everything to form a new country where people could pursue their dreams. Those men were not only great leaders in their day, but their influence continues to inspire others—all around the world—to step up and do great things.

I’m not a historian, but I have read enough about the US Founding Fathers to understand their vision that forming a country where people were free to pursue their dreams would lead to innovation, industry and prosperity. They knew that given the opportunity, individuals would rise up and do great things. They were right.

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2021: What Will Your Legacy Be?

Guest post by Bill Jensen

The next five years are likely to be the most crucial in your entire career.

If I’m not careful in how I pose the question, when I ask leaders about their legacy, I might get canned retirement speech. “I want to leave this business prepared for the future and knowing that I made a difference.”

But as our conversation continues, the import of considering one’s legacy within just the next five years becomes clear. This is an era of transformative disruption.

What keeps many leaders awake is being Uber’d — experiencing massive disruptions in everything they do that seem to come out of nowhere – disruptions that can uproot entire businesses and industries before they’ve finished their morning cup of coffee. Continue reading


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How to turn your small idea into a big success

“Creators build toward where they are going, not where they are.”

What if you had a key that could unlock tremendous growth and success in your life and business? How would you change your goals and desires with this knowledge? Would your ‘why’ change?

Each of us has the capacity to spot opportunities, invent products and capitalize on business—even create a $100 million business. Continue reading


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Great Leaders are Made, Not Born

Guest post by Allen Kors

While some may be born with an innate knack for great leadership skills like confidence, communication, and creativity, I’d like to argue that great leaders are made not born. Even if you are born with certain traits and talents, only through carefully developing those skills and talents can you learn to master the art of leadership. Being a great leader takes practice.

To develop great people skills, potential leaders need to learn how to become better listeners, how to accept critical feedback in a constructive way, and how to best display empathy and patience with other team members and colleagues. Continue reading


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One Compelling Question for Innovators

Guest post by David Sturt for Lead on Purpose blog

I recently came across a story in Wired magazine about a radically new technology being developed for heating and cooling. Aside from the exciting product idea to heat and cool a person rather than a place, I was intrigued by this statement about how the idea germinated:

At a point when humans need to take a sober look at our energy use, we’re poised to use a devastating amount of it keeping our homes and offices at the right temperatures in years to come. A team of students at MIT, however, is busy working on a prototype device that could eliminate much of that demand, and they’re doing it by asking one compelling question: “Why not just heat and cool our bodies instead?” (emphasis added).

Asking the right question is one of five key skills that predict great work, as identified from a sample of 1.7 million instances of award-winning work. Continue reading